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At 3:36am on September 26, 2012, SANTU SARDAR said…

Thank you for accept my friendship.

At 4:46am on May 10, 2012, Rchard Klein said…

Thanks for adding me!!!!

At 11:26pm on April 26, 2012, Dean Estrellado said…

thank you

At 7:41am on November 24, 2010, Michelle McNeal said…
Great pet photos minette
At 10:42pm on November 17, 2010, Bradley Hatton Jones said…
Hi Minette,

We have a South African group if you want to join.

You can find it in the groups page. :)

Regards,
B.Rad.
At 4:08am on November 12, 2010, Jason F Dreyer said…
Well, art, interior design, photography... all three are linked by a common aim: to please the eye. To capture visual artforms and derive pleasure from them. With your art you're physically creating what will later be seen and enjoyed. With interior design you're designing what you want to see and in photography we aim to capture the subject matter that is visually pleasing. Keep shooting! :)
At 4:44pm on November 5, 2010, Lea Mau Cook said…
Glad to meet you, thank you for the friend request. Get to know you better ~ Lea in Seattle
At 6:02am on November 04, 2010, Zvonko Petroski gave Minette van Heerden a gift
At 5:06am on November 4, 2010, Jason F Dreyer said…
Thanks for adding me Minette! Yes its good to see South Africans on this site! I'm always keen to meet others also interested in photography! :)
At 1:19pm on January 26, 2010, Scott Barnard said…
Thank you Minette for your kind words. Really am just learning my craft at present. Feel like a sponge and just want to soak up all knowledge. Very nice to meet you. Hope we can share info and thoughts. Best wishes my friendWarmest regards from England
Scott
At 11:18pm on January 25, 2010, Bill Dobbs said…
Hi Minette. As far as exposure, or in this case underexposure, you could achieve that by speeding up the shutter or by decreasing the aperture size (by using a higher f/stop number). Since your model is stationary I would choose the aperture you want first then set the shutter accordingly. The reason I'd choose aperture first is due to depth of field. The area that is in focus (depth of field) increases with a higher f/stop number. If you choose a low aperture number the background will likely be out of focus; very good for a portrait, very bad for a landscape shot.
For the inside shots, look for a window as a light source. This will be a big light source which gives great light for portraits. Experiment a lot.
One other thing to think about is that the first time you photograph someone tell them that it's an initial shoot; that after looking at the results you can determine what worked and what didn't then go out and reshoot. While it may seem like a lot of work to shoot twice, I think you'll find the second session will yield a high percentage of great shots.
At 12:56pm on January 25, 2010, Bill Dobbs said…
Regarding your bodybuilder assignment, I would utilize side light as much as possible to bring out contrast. Early morning/late evening when the sun is low. Simple yet bold backgrounds. Variety of angles; looking up, down, sideways. If it's sunny I'd underexpose a bit to hold details in shadow areas. Without knowing what your location is going to be that's about all I can offer. Good luck.
At 11:08pm on January 24, 2010, Bill Dobbs said…
Hi Minette. HDR (High Dynamic Range) is a fancy way of saying that all the exposure values (the brights of the cloud/sky and the darks of the shadows) are all properly exposed. Since neither film or digital sensors can capture the brightest and darkest portions of a high contrast scene without losing detail we need a way to correct for this. Some cameras are now capable of doing this (Sony Alpha 350) with a HDR function. The way to do it manually is to take two or three shots of a scene using a tripod, exposing each one for different values of the scene. Then in photo editing software like Photoshop or Photomatix you would layer the shots one on top of the other and bring out the best from each into your final version. The latest issue of Outdoor Photographer has several articles on the topic, plus searching on Google for HDR will bring up many sites that discuss the method.
If you can, give it a try; you'll be amazed at the results particularly on those days where bright cloudy skies make it hard to get good results.
At 2:28am on January 19, 2010, Ryan said…
Sure :-D Heheh, I'd be happy to have you in my list :-) Added ;-)
At 6:59am on January 18, 2010, Ryan said…
Hello Minette :-) Welcome to PictureSocial.com!
At 6:50am on January 18, 2010, Earl E. Gibson said…
Hello Minette and Welcome to PictureSocial. Hope you find it an enjoyable place that you can learn and maybe teach others. We do have a wide range of User Groups. If you are interested, you can find them under the "Groups" tab at the top of the page. Hope to see you there.

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